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Parsnip and Carrot Chips

Parsnip and Carrot Chips


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After peeling one of the carrots, use the vegetable peeler to peel away long strips from the whole length of the carrot, allowing the strips to drop into a large bowl. Turn the carrot in your hand about one-quarter turn after every 4 or 5 strips, so you’ll generally have strips of similar width and length overall. Do the same with the remaining carrots and the parsnips, both of which have a tough core that should be discarded once you get there (the color tends to change slightly).

Pour about 2 inches of oil into a large heavy saucepan (the oil should not come more than halfway up the sides of the pan). Bring to 375 degrees over medium heat.

While the oil is heating, combine the salt and thyme in a small dish and rub them together between your fingers for a bit to release the aromatics of the thyme.

Carefully add a handful of the vegetable strips to the oil and fry until lightly browned and crisp, about 1-2 minutes. Use the back of a slotted spoon to gently press the strips down into the oil and spread them out a bit to help ensure even cooking. When crisped, lift out the strips and scatter them on paper towels to drain. Repeat with the remaining vegetable strips, allowing the oil to reheat between batches as needed.

Transfer the chips to a serving bowl, sprinkle the thyme-salt mixture over them, and serve. They will be best served shortly after frying.


Super Bowl Recipe: Parsnip and Carrot Chips

The kale chip is so 2010. It’s time to update our non-potato chip repertoire with a new vegetable.

Enter Parsnip and Carrot Chips courtesy of Cynthia Nims, author of Salty Snacks: Make Your Own Chips, Crisps, Crackers, Pretzels, Dips, and Other Savory Bites published by Ten-Speed Press. Last weekend on Good Food Evan spoke to Nims about her Super Bowl recipe ideas. We all know that chips are a must for game watching, so this weekend when you shop the farmers market look out for larger carrots and parsnips to turn into a homemade alternative to Lay’s. (And we won’t judge if you reach for the retro kale too…adding kale chips to this duo sounds like a colorful and tasty addition. You just might want to cook them separately.)

Keep reading for her recipe…

Parsnip and Carrot Chips

Makes 4 to 6 servings

3 large carrots (about 1 pound)

2 large parsnips (about 1 pound)

1 teaspoon kosher salt or flaky or coarse sea salt

1 /2 teaspoon minced fresh thyme

After peeling one of the carrots, use the vegetable peeler to peel away long strips from the whole length of the carrot, allowing the strips to drop into a large bowl. Turn the carrot in your hand about one-quarter turn after every 4 or 5 strips, so you’ll generally have strips of similar width and length overall. Do the same with the remaining carrots and the parsnips, both of which have a tough core that should be discarded once you get there (the color tends to change slightly).

Pour about 2 inches of oil into a large heavy saucepan (the oil should not come more than halfway up the sides of the pan). Bring to 375°F over medium heat.

While the oil is heating, combine the salt and thyme in a small dish and rub them together between your fingers for a bit to release the aromatics of the thyme.

Carefully add a handful of the vegetable strips to the oil and fry until lightly browned and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Use the back of a slotted spoon to gently press the strips down into the oil and spread them out a bit to help ensure even cooking. When crisped, lift out the strips and scatter them on paper towels to drain. Repeat with the remaining vegetable strips, allowing the oil to reheat between batches as needed.

Transfer the chips to a serving bowl, sprinkle the thyme-salt mixture over them, and serve. They will be best served shortly after frying.

Reprinted with permission from Salty Snacks: Make Your Own Chips, Crisps, Crackers, Pretzels, Dips, and Other Savory Bites by Cynthia Nims, copyright © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group.

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Baked Carrot and Parsnip Chips

  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 35 min
  • Servings: 2

Ingredients

1 large or 2 medium parsnips

1 large or 2 medium carrots

1 teaspoon thyme leaves (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Lightly oil a cookie sheet.
  3. Using Y-shape veggie peeler, create long strips of the carrot and parsnip and place them on cookie sheet.
  4. Drizzle oil or use a sprayer to cover veggies evenly with oil.
  5. Season veggies with sea salt and thyme leaves, if using.
  6. Lay flat on cookie sheet and bake for 35 minutes, or until crisp and golden, turning vegetables with spatula 2-3 times during cooking time.

Nutrition Information

Per Serving: Calories: 131 Total Fat: 5g Saturated Fat: 1g Monounsaturated Fat: 3g Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g Cholesterol: 0mg Sodium: 241mg Potassium: 299mg Carbohydrate: 22g Fiber: 5g Sugar: 3g Protein: 2g

Nutrition Bonus: Vit A: 214% Vit C: 19% Iron: 4%


How to make carrot chips

It's so easy! Scroll down to the recipe card for the detailed instructions. Here are the basic steps:

1. You simply coat thin carrot slices with olive oil and spices.

2. Then roast them in a hot oven until crispy. This should take about 20 minutes in a 450°F oven.

Note that some of the carrot slices will brown faster, depending on their thickness and where they're places in the pan. Simply remove them and keep roasting the ones left in the pan.


The pale parsnip is so much more than a carrot with the color photoshopped out of it. Parsnips are delicious and interesting, and they absolutely deserve our attention. Despite the fact that they're usually eaten just once or twice in winter, or else brought to the Thanksgiving table where they are lost in a cornucopia of side dishes, these hearty root vegetables have serious culinary backbone. That's why we firmly believe that parsnips should feature on our dinner and lunch menus far more often than they do.

Parsnips are typically a cold-season root vegetable, and they're ideally harvested after the first frost (a cold snap makes them sweeter). Adaptable and healthy, high in fiber, vitamin C, and minerals (especially potassium), they are versatile enough to carry a vegetarian entrée, diversify a salad, or create a creamily comforting soup. Perhaps one of the reasons that this blond taproot remains underutilized and undervalued is that it is sold naked. Unlike bunched carrots with their tops on, parsnips are displayed without their eye-catching foliage. There is a good reason for this: Exposure to their leafsap can cause a photosensitive contact dermatitis, similar to poison ivy, as anyone who has inadvertently hiked through a feral patch can attest. But removing their leaves before sale keeps everyone safe.

So, how do you prep and cook parsnips? They can be peeled before use, but their skins are an additional source of flavor, so scrubbing up a batch to roast is a cinch. Refreshingly crisp when uncooked, they turn mellow and soft after boiling&mdasheasy to mash and purée. Roasting emphasizes their sweetness. They can even be used in dessert! We highly suggest trying our Spiced Parsnip Cupcakes. We promise, you'll be glad you did.


The Crunchy Effect: Make These Double Dill Parsnip And Carrot Chips

Embedded deep in our biological make up, there is a drive to search out foods that are both crunchy and salty. Chips are the obvious quick fix – and our urge to overindulge is one of the toughest food habits to break. When we found Chips by Chris Bryant, a cookbook full of healthy plant-based chip recipes, we were instantly hooked. All baked, none fried, you’ll find that each recipe fits into your new years resolution criteria. Start with these parsnip and carrot chips, our new chip of choice for 2015 – move aside kale! Not into these root veggies? Choose from an array of other savory or sweet varieties, including vegetables (potatoes of all kinds, beets, squash), fruit (apples, bananas, pears), and other fun options (pitas, tortillas, wonton wrappers). Whatever your poison, get your chip fix without the fear or guilt of eating fried fats and body-bloating salt. Here are a few notes from the chip connoisseur. before you get cooking…

Carrots, parsnips, and dill are cousins in the plant world and kissing cousins in this recipe.These pretty orange-and-yellow sticks are seasoned with lots of zesty dill seed and lacy dill weed. The recipe follows the low-and-slow method to prevent the sweet carrots from browning too quickly. If you’re impatient and don’t mind some dark chips mixed in with the light, check out the alternate cooking methods. Carrots and parsnips have an affinity to rich Indian spices.

Hunting/Gathering: Select stout carrots and parsnips—the wider the better. To offset the significant shrinkage that will occur during the cooking process, use carrots and parsnips that are at least 1 inch wide, or your ribbons may look more like fettuccini. For a colorful presentation, track down some of the red, purple, or yellow heirloom carrots available at farmers’ markets and some grocery stores.

Double Dill Carrot and Parsnip Ribbons
4 cups

Ingredients:

1/2–1 pound carrots, choose wide ones
1/2–1 pound parsnips, ditto that wide
1 tablespoon walnut or olive oil
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dill seed
1–2 tablespoons fresh dill weed, loosely chopped (or 1/2–1 teaspoon dried)

Directions:

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.

To make the slices, I recommend a Y-shaped vegetable peeler for this recipe. Lay the carrot or parsnip on a counter and hold it firmly at the stem end. Pull the peeler down the root in a steady, even motion, bearing down to make thicker shavings than you would for peeling.

Hint: When my Y-shaped peeler can’t get at the last part of the root, I make a platform to perch it on out of the flat-sided handle of a large knife. This allows you to get every last ribbon.

Combine the oil and spices in a mixing bowl. Drop in the carrot and parsnip ribbons and toss them until they’re evenly coated.

Arrange the ribbons in straight lines on the baking sheets. They can touch and overlap slightly.

Bake the ribbons for 30 minutes, then rotate the baking sheets and switch their positions in the oven. Bake for another 20 to 40 minutes (or more depending on thickness), until the color begins to deepen and some of the edges start to brown.

Pluck out any ribbons that are done early. Sprinkle the chips with salt, if you like, as soon as they come out of the oven. Allow them to cool on the baking sheets for at least 10 minutes before serving. They’ll get crisper as they cool.

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How to Make Crisp Dehydrated Vegetable Chips

Dehydrated vegetable chips make a delicious and healthful snack. And they are easy to prepare too. Gather your favorite root vegetables such as carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes or parsnips, slice them thinly and then blanch the slices to preserve the flavors and nutrients. A food dehydrator will dehydrate the vegetable slices within approximately six hours and you will have a plentiful supply of crisp, dehydrated vegetable chips for munching.

Fill the stockpot with water and bring it to a boil.

Peel the vegetables and slice them into thin slices. The thinner the slices, the crispier they will be when they are dehydrated.

Place the sliced vegetables into the boiling water. Watch the vegetables as they boil and remove them when their color intensifies. This will not take more than one to two minutes.

Strain the vegetables from the hot water and place the vegetables into the bowl of ice water. Leave the vegetables in the ice water for two minutes. Strain the vegetables from the cold water.

Spread the vegetables onto the paper towels and blot them dry lightly.

Place the sliced vegetables onto the trays of the food dehydrator. Place them in a single layer and do not allow the vegetables to overlap. Sprinkle salt onto the vegetables lightly, if desired.

Set the food dehydrator to 125 degrees and turn it on. Leave the vegetables for approximately four hours and then check the progress. If the vegetable slices are crispy and there is no moistness left in the slices, turn the dehydrator off. If they are still moist, continue dehydrating until they are crispy. Continue to check the vegetables every hour until they are sufficiently dry.

Remove the dehydrated vegetable slices from the dehydrator and allow them to cool completely. Place the vegetables in a plastic container. Seal the container and store the dehydrated vegetable chips for up to one year in a cool location out of direct sunlight.

Bake vegetable chips in the oven or microwave by slicing the vegetables into thin slices, spreading them in a single layer on a baking sheet, sprinkling the desired seasonings over them, and drizzling with oil. Bake in the oven at 350 degrees F for 20 minutes. Microwave on high for four to six minutes, let stand for one minute and then microwave until they are crispy and brown (another two to three minutes).


Busy in Brooklyn

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Parsnip Honey Cake with Honey Cream Cheese Frosting & Rainbow Carrot Chips

I’m not a baker. Let me start with that. Sure I can follow a cake recipe. And I’ve even made the occasional Elmo and Barbie cake for my kids birthdays. But I don’t “bake”. Especially not cakes like THIS.

I don’t know what it is. The whole layering thing. And the frosting. It’s just such a MESS. Case in point: I decided to defy all logic and attempted to layer my cakes without trimming them first, so that they were flat. Of course the layers started slipping and sliding, so I had to separate them, post-frosting and then do the trimming. Mess is not the word. My kids were pretty happy though. They got to enjoy the best part of the honey cake (the sticky top layer), all smothered in frosting.

Now since this IS a honey cake, trimming the best part off the layers is such a sin. So I highly recommend you follow this technique so that the layers bake flat. Wish I had followed my own advice but I just get lazy when it comes to baking.


Case #2 in point, I let my frosting sit out after whipping it, and it got kinda warm and runny, but instead of refrigerating it so that it would hold up nicely, I just wanted to stack the cake already. THIS is why I don’t bake. No patience. Baking is all about precision, patience and organization, and while I do possess those qualities, baking does not exactly bring them out in me. Maybe it’s because I just want to get it done so I can dig in to the cake already!

So why this cake? Well, I came up with this crazy cool concept of doing a carrot cake/honey cake hybrid. And if that wasn’t enough, I had to switch up the carrots for parsnips, and take it over the top with FRIED RAINBOW CARROTS STRIPS. It’s go big or go home. Especially if I am about to make a layered cake!

I developed this recipe in honor of Rosh Hashanah, when it is traditional to eat honey cake, for a Sweet New Year. Since many people have a custom not to eat nuts on Rosh Hashanah, I knew I couldn’t garnish my cake with chopped pecans, which would have been my first choice. Shredded coconut is another great option but I wanted a little hint to the surprise inside the cake – the parsnips!

Honestly, I can’t say this cake tastes like parsnips. It tastes like honey cake. But when you get a couple of shreds of parsnip in your mouth, you get a little hint of flavor. If you want more of a parsnip flavor, add some more shredded parsnips to the cake. It’s as simple as that :)

I honestly could not be happier about the way this cake came out. I totally winged the recipe, and not understanding the science of baking, it could have been a complete flop. I was almost not expecting the cake to work but it came out so unbelievably moist! And my kids kept running downstairs wanting to know what smelled so INCREDIBLE.


I KNOW this cake is good for one reason and one reason only. The world’s most pickiest taste testers LOVED IT. My kids gobbled up the cake, licked their fingers, and said OH MY G-D between fork fulls. I kid you not. This is a home run. Kid tested. Mother approved.

1 cup coconut milk (I use Coconut Dream Original)
3 eggs
1 cup oil
1 1/2 cups honey
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
3 cups flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp allspice
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp cloves
1/2 tsp salt
2 heaping cups shredded parsnips

Honey Cream Cheese Frosting
(may be doubled, depending on how much frosting you like)

1 stick butter or margarine
1 8 oz. pkg cream cheese (may use tofutti)
3 cups confectioners sugar
1 heaping tbsp honey
1/8 tsp cinnamon

1 bunch rainbow carrots
canola oil, for frying

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour three 9-inch cake pans and set aside.

With an electric mixture, cream the coconut milk, eggs, oil, honey, brown sugar and vanilla. In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, baking soda and spices. Slowly add the dry ingredients to the wet, mixing until you have a smooth batter. Stir in the shredded parsnips.

Divide the batter evenly between the pans and bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Leave the cakes to cool while you prepare the frosting.

Add all the frosting ingredients to a bowl and blend with a hand mixer until smooth and creamy.

Remove the cakes from the pans and trim so that they are completely flat (you can use this trick to bake completely flat layers). Frost each cake layer and scrape the sides to create the look of a naked cake.

To make the rainbow carrot chips, wash the carrots well and pat dry. Peel the carrots with a vegetable peeler, creating strips of carrots. Heat a few inches of oil in a deep skillet and fry the carrots in batches, until crisp and golden. Drain on paper towels.

Before serving, garnish the cake with carrot chips.

VARIATION: Use carrots instead of parsnips in the cake, or use a mixture of both.
OPTIONAL FILLINGS: chopped walnuts, chopped pecans, shredded coconut, raisins, dried pineapple.
OPTIONAL TOPPINGS: chopped or sliced nuts (walnuts, almonds or pecans), shredded coconut.
BUNDT or LOAF PAN OPTION: This cake may be made in a bundt pan or 3 small loaf pans. Place the pans on a baking sheet to catch spills. Grease and flour pan and pour batter inside it. Bake until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Top with cream cheese frosting and toppings of your choice.


Even Your Mother Will Approve Of Vegetable Chips

We know we need to eat more vegetables. The challenge is to do it with flavor and variety. So we've become creative.

Put all your vegetables in a blender, pulverize and serve. There's a booth at my local farmers market dispensing cups of green slop to devotees of that religion. I've tried it. I haven't converted.

I've tried a range of veggie chips from paper-thin, crisp kale and spinach chips to more muscular taro and beet chips. They're all winners — tasty, colorful and fun to make.

Another approach is to chop up whatever you find in your vegetable drawer and put it on lettuce. This is more viable but looks and tastes an awful lot like salad, something that's been around for a while.

Or, take a mandoline to your vegetables, toss with olive oil and a dash of salt and serve them hot alongside a sandwich as chips. This vegetables-as-chips innovation has gone viral and can be found in grocery stores, restaurants and food trucks across the country. I've leapt onto this bandwagon with both feet. (If you don't have a mandoline, use a sharp knife.)

If you're like most Americans, you love chips, particularly potato chips. We eat more than 1.5 billion pounds of potato chips per year (about 6 pounds per person), making them our nation's favorite snack. Despite their gloriously crunchy appeal, potato chips aren't that good for you.

Veggie chips, in contrast, are practically a health food in comparison, especially where they're tossed with heart-healthy olive oil and baked, not fried. I've tried a range of veggie chips from paper-thin, crisp kale and spinach chips to more muscular taro and beet chips. They're all winners — tasty, colorful and fun to make. The best part is that you need no technology more sophisticated than a sharp knife.

About The Author

Susan Russo is a food writer in San Diego. She publishes stories, recipes and photos on her cooking blog, Food Blogga. Her latest cookbook is Recipes Every Man Should Know. When she isn't writing about her Italian family back in Rhode Island or life with her husband in Southern California, she can be found milling around a local farmers market buying a lot more food than two people could possibly eat.


Hardbite Parsnip Chip Update

I posted a couple weeks ago about the potentially incorrect carb information on Hardbite parsnip chips. I've received a reply today that they will be getting the parsnip chips nutritional content tested. I'm not an expert, but I would be unsurprised if the actual carb values end up in the 15g-20g range per 40g serving. Their latest reply is below:

Thank you for your diligence in our nutritional information. We truly appreciate your feedback. Part of being from a relatively small company, we accept the things we can’t do for ourselves and we source it elsewhere. We did this with our nutritionals as we are not food scientists, just people looking to make a good chips. Thanks to people like yourself, we have started the process of sending our chips regularly for nutritional testing and we have found some discrepancies (much like the one you’ve found for Sweet Onion) and will be addressing them shortly. The information on the website is correct for the beet and carrot.

We will validate our 3rd party for the parsnips shortly because we have questioned the results as well but were assured from the experts that the information was indeed correct. I’d like to formally apologize for the incorrect information, and as a company, we have learned to think more critically of the lab results that we receive.



Comments:

  1. Dayne

    And is there another option?

  2. Honaw

    I apologize, but I think you are wrong.

  3. Yozshuran

    Wonderfully!

  4. Nikokora

    It is agreeable, the admirable thought

  5. Osweald

    An incomparable phrase;)

  6. Mooguktilar

    Congratulations, great idea and timely

  7. Mel

    Where the world slides?



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